• crop5
    no-one should be lonely in our friendly town
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    no-one should be lonely in our friendly town
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    no-one should be lonely in our friendly town
  • crop4
    no-one should be lonely in our friendly town
  • crop2
    no-one should be lonely in our friendly town
  • crop1
    no-one should be lonely in our friendly town

Just how loud are you singing?

Just how loud are you singing?

In the shower, in front of a mirror, standing at a Karaoke machine most of us enjoy a good sing.  Some are confident chorus line singers – happy to belt it out, whilst others quietly let their contribution mingle with that of others.  However we like to sing, if you are anything like us, what, when and how we sing is affected by how we feel.  If all is well in our world we might be happy to sing a few lines and skip along the prom to the rhythm created by an imaginary band, if things are less good we might sing soft, sad lines that reflect exactly how we feel at that moment.

This thought of how and where we sing came to us as we read some words which created a mental image of a scared, huddled character standing far back from the edge of the stage, singing, but only just.  In reading those words our thought was, how do we get that person to move from the back of the stage closer to the front, to lift their voice so more people can hear them?  It resonated with us because; as a charity working with people aged 50+ we want older people to recognise their own worth and for society to remember the value of every older person.  Rather than older people placing a huge burden on society, numerous studies show that older people play a key economic role – to the tune of £40bn more to the economy than they receive in state pensions, welfare and health services.  This is set to grow in coming years so that by 2030 projections indicate that the net contribution of older people with be worth some £75bn!  Not just adding value to the economy of our country, an ICM poll for a WRVS study found that 65% of older people say they regularly help their elderly neighbours and they are the most likely of all adult age groups to do so.

So, if you are standing at the back of the stage of life, can we urge you to come forward and sing a bit louder?  You are worth hearing!

Failing to plan, is planning to fail - Alan Lakein

Failing to plan, is planning to fail - Alan Lakein

No-one sets out to fail, in fact quite the opposite, most of us do all that we can to make sure that we don’t!  Memories of past failures can haunt us even into older age and some may live with the consequences of those failures for years.  Another quote on the theme of planning that really caught our attention was ‘Planning is bringing the future into the present so that you can do something about it now.’

 

Here at Hope Trust we meet many people who find themselves in a place they didn’t expect to be.  The loss of a loved one, a change in health or mobility, family moving away (or falling out) all have an impact that has to be adapted to.  The joy of living in Felixstowe is that the town offers so much; things to do, people to meet, interests to be shared, lunches to be enjoyed – what is required is a first step, a willingness to have a go, a plan for the next stage of life - whatever that might look like - and that’s where Hope Trust can help.  Whether it’s signposting to activities that appeal, or to services that need to be engaged such as getting a cleaner or gardener, we can suggest some next steps.  We want to see older people in Felixstowe living the life they want to live, for as long as possible – not getting caught out by a failure to plan, but bringing the future into the present, to do something, anything, now.

 

To assist you Hope Trust offers a range of weekly and monthly activities, give us a call if you want to find out more.  Simple one to one cookery classes, weekend lunches, the 6-week Bereavement Support Group that started on 3rd April, befriending, the chance to play board games, attend an exercise class, receive a chatty letter, you name it, we’re either doing it or we are considering doing it.  Realising how important planning is, we are looking ahead so that when you need us we’ll be there, ready and willing to help when you get in touch.

What is your story?

What is your story?

Imagine that you are sitting in a comfy chair, relaxed, pen in hand (or tablet computer if you prefer!) about to write the story of your life.  You might start with early memories, great holidays, places visited until, eventually, you start to remember the hopes and dreams you had for your life.  As you sit in that comfy chair in March 2017, how close is the reality of your life to those hopes and dreams?

We were reading something recently when a phrase jumped out at us ‘They had forgotten their own story.’   The story of why we are where we are now, the decisions that brought us to this point, good or bad.  We also chatted about whether it is ever too late to change direction; we decided no, it’s never too late but we realise it does get much harder as we mature.

Here at Hope Trust we try to help people to write the next chapter of their life, trying to help them move from where they are, closer to where they want to be.  If it’s to get fitter, more mobile, less likely to fall we direct people to an exercise class we passed across to ActivLives; if it’s to understand more about bereavement we direct them to our next 6-week Bereavement Support Group which starts on 3rd April but with a chance to find out what the course entails on Saturday 25th March, 10.30am here at Maidstone Hall.  If it’s to share a home cooked Sunday lunch with other people, we invite them along to our monthly meal.  If it’s to volunteer with us, to come along and chat to us about potential roles (we currently have vacancies for a Trustee and 1:1 befrienders.)

So, if you need help to start the next chapter of your life, simply get in touch - we are here to help.